We need you!

Have you ever thought of becoming a Mentor with the Alphabettes Mentorship Program? Now is the time to jump into this rewarding and exciting experience. Simply fill in this form and wait to be matched.

Spring term just openend, and we are on the hunt for growing our pool of mentors.

  • Not sure you could be a mentor? If you are unsure you are a good fit to join as a Mentor send us message and we will chat with you about it. Most likely you ARE a great fit, and can really help making a change in people’s lives ❤️️
  • Worried about the commitment? If this is a busy time for you, you can sign up for as little as a 1 month program (about 4 sessions).Moreover, you get to decide with the Mentee your preferred method of communication: Zoom, email, Slack or a combination.
  • How is the schedule? The sessions are flexible in time and dates, and you set them with your Mentee in a way which will make it work for both of you.
  • Will I need to be a mentor forever? We have two annual terms: spring and autumn. After every term, we check in and confirm with you that you are happy to continue. However, if you feel like you need a break, you can always pause.
  • What if I’m not a type designer? We have so many topics that Mentees are seeking guidance on: research, education, lettering, font production, business, writing, typography. If you are in type, you can be a huge help.
  • Can only women be a mentor? Not at all! Everyone is welcome. Since Alphabettes is a network supporting woman, we centre a woman in every pair.
  • Want to hear more? We can send you a recording of a previous Q&A session we did for Mentors. Just email us!
  • We look forward to you!
    The AMP team,
    Eleni, Katy, Liron, Shani, and Veronika

    Mentorship showcase party recording

    A few weeks ago, in February 2021, we celebrated the achievements of the over 200 participants in the Alphabettes Mentorship Program.

    10 selected Mentees presented their projects that they had developed, advanced and critiqued within their mentorship in 2020. They included research and design of the Sharada script, guidance on structuring research material, exploring the personal lettering style, help navigating the business side of type, experimenting with the Gujurati script, digitising and preserving old Columbian metal street signs, turning intricate lettering into a typeface, reviewing a personal typeface, and developing a typeface inspired by Mexican price label cards found in food markets.

    For those who missed these awesome Mentees and their work, you can view them all in this video.

    Thank you to all Mentees and their fantstic Mentors whitout whose incredible commitment and time these wonderful results would not have been possible!

    More results and projects to come soon.

    The Alphabettes Mentorship Team
    Eleni, Liron, Katy, Shani, and Veronika

    Celebrating Mentees & Mentors

    alphabettes mentorship program

    Five years after the Alphabettes Mentorship Program’s (AMP) initiation, we thought it’s time to throw a (online) party! The achievements of the many wonderful people are certainly worth celebrating!

    We’d love to present all projects, but the roughly 200 are simply too many for one evening. So we decided to select a bunch of mentees from various backgrounds with different goals and challenges.

    The projects are developed, advanced and critiqued within their mentorship in 2020. Each of the mentees will have a short presentation to showcase their work and discuss their learnings, experiences and next steps. We very much look forward sharing these stories with you!

    alphabettes mentorship

    Additionally the opening dates for the 2021 AMP season will be announced and we keenly welcome feedback and new ideas for the program.

    Come and join us for the presentations on Zoom and then for socialising on Wonder. The party will take place on 21 Feb at 16:00 GMT. You can check starting time for your timezone.

    Please register at Eventbrite for details.

    We look forward to welcome you on the 21 February,
    Eleni, Katy, Liron, Shani and Veronika

    The end

    When Bianca Berning suggested creating this series, I found it hard to join. What could be the little thing that made me get through this horrible year? A year that has put us so much outside our comfort zone that we forgot there was such comfort once; a year that has shown us vulnerable; a year that has polarised our feelings so deeply that we made mistakes, we were angry, we fucked up.

    Nevertheless, I added my name to the list. I wanted so badly to find the one thing that made me get through, but I couldn’t find it. Because there wasn’t one. Just one. Instead, I have memories of the days we made pizza at home (some Pinterest some Pinstrosity!), or when my new flatmate Juana made piña coladas, the hours I spent sorting out the jigsaw pieces (yes, sorting by size, form and colour! So soothing), or the excitement when the post arrived after two or three weeks (in the UK this is unheard of). There was the happiness of the day I found flour in one shop during the flour shortage and the healing bike journeys in and out of a deserted London. I remember the moments staring at the neighbours’ cats and then, when we were able to access their back garden, the time spent watching the wrens, the robin and the blackbirds, or suffering together with the blackbird when her nest was gruesomely attacked by a magpie. There was the time when I tried to save the sick laurel by washing meticulously each leaf and the excitement when the dried ferns came back to life after some watering.

    2020 mix and match
    Continue reading

    Home is where the heart is

    I left my home country of Iran and my parents who live there in 2014, and since then I have made it a priority to visit every year for a few weeks. This was perfectly manageable, whether during a one year MA degree course, financial strains, or times of political uncertainty, I made the trip back. The last time I visited was September 2019; I told my parents I would be getting married, and when they hugged me goodbye in the airport, somehow separating seemed less painful this time. I would be returning soon for a non-negotiable wedding party. I trust I don’t need to explain what happened next. This is the longest I’ve been away from my parents and the home I grew up in—my mom’s cooking and the smell of her hugs. My dad’s dad jokes and his reassuring smile. Continue reading

    What mattered to me

    After deciding to become a graphic designer at some point during the first 23 years of my life in Siberia, I remember spending my days alone, in front of a computer: taking online classes, watching design conferences, and making self-initiated projects. I preferred to avoid client work that didn’t show promise in favor of my own, made-up assignments that would look good in my book. Instead of collaborating with people around me, I focused on getting better at my craft with as few distractions as possible. It seems that eventually I got what I wanted: I made a portfolio good enough to move to New York. 
    Continue reading

    Better Vegetables

    Iceland hasn’t been hit by the pandemic quite like most other countries have. Few permanent residents, very few tourists, vast space and clean, crisp air meant that the virus had little chance to spread up here in the North of Iceland. Travel cancellations are the one noticeable sacrifice which meant we had to stay in our little safe, but chilly and remote place.

    However, there is something that I generally really really miss in our remote part of the world – pandemic or not: a variety in fresh produce. Continue reading

    The Author is In

    child's hands coloring

    Cover page of “The Fairies and Ballerinas”


    It’s been nearly 10 months since my kids went to school, slept over a friend’s house (let alone went into a friend’s house), stayed with a babysitter or grandparents, and lived in pre-covid normalcy. That also means it’s been 10 months of no childcare and a glaring lack of productivity in my own work. Since March, my writing practice and research agenda has taken an abrupt backseat to managing the daily flaming hellscape of remote learning for my two elementary school kids while also teaching full-time. This is fine.

    Back in the early days of lockdown, my daughter began watching Lunch Doodles with Mo Willems, two weeks of daily drawing and writing activities that inspired her, a kindergartener whose first year of “real” school was cut short, to begin making books. If Mo Willems, an award-winning illustrator and author, can do it, why can’t she?

    Continue reading