Film review: Graphic Means

A detail from the Graphic Means official poster.

If you were a part of this era, but especially if you weren’t, you must see Graphic Means.

These days, it is easier to find information regarding printing in 15th century Europe than graphic design processes in the United States during the 1970s and ’80s. The latter, the focus of Graphic Means, was a major transition for the design and printing industry as centuries old procedures and machinery made way for photographic processes and eventually digital technology. This dramatic shift has not been well-documented, perhaps due to the quick speed of the conversion or that it is still in recent memory.

Continue reading

RIP Margo Chase 1958–2017

I was very sad to hear about the sudden passing of designer Margo Chase. As a teenager in the 90s, it’s hard not to recognize Chase’s impact on the visual language of popular culture in those formative years (Buffy the Vampire Slayer! Dracula! Madonna!). Her lettering, logos, and typefaces are emblematic of an era where forms were being developed and explored that truly expressed digitality. If you’re not familiar with Chase’s work, check out these short interviews on Lynda.com, especially Logos and lettering, which includes some discussion of her early influences and process, and Gothic design where she talks about her cover design for Letter Arts Review, and her typefaces (thanks Typographica for the link). Some nice tributes can be found on Brand New, Graphic Design USA, Art Chantry’s Facebook post, Richard Lipton’s instagram post, The Dieline, among many others.

Margo Chase is an inspiration to all designers. As the founder of her own agency AND an accomplished acrobatics pilot, Alphabettes salutes this pioneering woman who left a mark on our profession.

Letters in Letters
A chat with Carolyn Porter

If you have been following my interview series here on the blog, you might already know that there is a well-defined structure for those conversations. Today, I want to share an interview done in a different way. It will be quicker, a bit more friendly and not any less personal. Carolyn recently published a typeface and a book, and those two were good enough reasons to sit down and enjoy a virtual conversation about the process.

Continue reading

Exhibition Review: The Calligraphy Revival 1906–2016

Diane von Arx, United States, 2002

The Grolier Club’s exhibition The Calligraphy Revival 1906–2016 (May 17 – July 29, 2017; 10am–5pm Mon–Sat; free admission) is a unique opportunity for anyone interested in applications of western letterforms to experience firsthand the breadth of calligraphy’s beauty as well as its utility. The exhibition, curated by Jerry Kelly, features works by a diverse range of calligraphers. It runs the gamut from art to design to handwriting and often defies categorization.

Continue reading

Alphabettes Variety Show: we’re back!

UPDATE! Couldn’t make it to the live variety show or just want to relive the whole thing? Here’s the recording (listen on the site or download):

mixlr.com/alphabettes/showreel/alphabettes-variety-show-at-typographics-2017/

Here are a few fun highlights, captured on twitter:

Thanks for listening!

❤️📻❤️📻❤️📻❤️📻❤️📻❤️📻❤️📻❤️📻❤️📻❤️📻❤️📻❤️📻❤️📻❤️

Continue reading

Typographic Potential of Variable Fonts

This article is based on the presentation What The Government Doesn’t Want You to Know About Variable Fonts delivered at ISType conference in Istanbul. It’s a summary of my personal thoughts on recent developments that might have an effect on responsive typography. It is also a collection of references to inspiring projects and experiments some of my colleagues have been doing. It touches on a few concepts I found necessary to explain but it shouldn’t be considered an in-depth report on those. Continue reading

Takeaways on Teaching Type

Left: The organizers! Dan Wong, Doug Clouse, Liz DeLuna, and Aaris Sherin, photo courtesy of Liz DeLuna; Right: The panelists! Juliette Cezzar, John Gambell, Amy Papaelias, Thomas Jockin, photo courtesy of Nina Stössinger

This past weekend, I had the pleasure to participate in Teaching Type: A Panel Conversation on Typography Education, organized by Design Incubation, and hosted at the Type Directors Club in New York. The event attracted a range of attendees: educators, typographers, type designers and even a few students and recent graduates. Armed with only the most comfortable of metal chairs, we set out on a 3-hour journey to explore best practices of typography curricula today.

Continue reading

Type Days Ljubljana 2017

We are Alja Herlah and Krista Likar, enthusiastic and passionate type designers from Slovenia. As members of the TipoBrda society, we got the opportunity to organize a type design workshop. Type Days 2017 – a one week long workshop – was already the 31th type design workshop organized by Tipo Brda in Slovenia. It took place in Ljubljana in the House of Reading and Writing, Vodnikova domačija Šiška. This year, we invited a guest mentor Adam Katyi, Hungarumlaut, who shared a lot of valuable tips and guidelines he learned while studying at the Type and Media program in The Hague.

Continue reading

News—January 2017

“The Women’s March on Washington. Photo courtesy of Nina Stössinger.
The Women’s March on Washington. Photo courtesy of Nina Stössinger.

Our fellow Alphabettes continued to make the world a better place in the first month of 2017.* Here are a few of their good deeds.

Christine Bateup is the director of business and licensing at Frere-Jones Type. She’s also a lawyer. As part of a team of lawyers working pro bono on behalf of the New York chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union, she helped free an Iraqi green card holder from detention at Kennedy airport.

With partner Noel Pretorius, María Ramos released Kinetic, a sans serif partly inspired by the mobile designs of Alexander Calder.

After filling in for Tobias Frere-Jones during the fall semester, Nina Stössinger returned to Yale for the spring semester to teach her own type design class in the graphic design MFA program. Nina’s typeface Nordvest received Communication ArtsAward of Excellence, and Fontshop named the face one of the best of 2016.

Lila Symons was also recognized by Communication Arts, and Maria Montes, Marta Cerdà, and Nina shared some of their treasured finds with the magazine.

Ksenya Samarskaya talked to Print.

Adobe invited Martina Flor to take part in a live lettering session in Paris; she also gave a lettering workshop in Berlin.

Hoefler & Co. released Ringside, a sprawling grotesque sans serif family for which Sara Soskolne served as the lead designer. First client? The Obamas.

Laura Meseguer and Nadine Chahine explored public lettering in Barcelona and London, respectively, for the French documentary series Safari Typo.

ATypI posted a series of interviews Liron Lavi Turkenich conducted at the conference in Warsaw.

Alice Savoie served as a judge for the TDC 63/Typography 38 competitions and spoke at the Type Directors Club with Janine Vangool.

Colvert, designed by Natalia Chuvatin, Jonathan Fabreguettes, Kristyan Sarkis, and Irene Vlachou, has been added to the permanent collection of the French National Center for Visual Arts (CNAP).

Veronika Burian and Mary Kate McDevitt served on the jury of Print’s 2016 Typography & Lettering Awards. Ferran Milan and Pilar Cano’s Aurélie took Best in Class for typeface design; Krista Radoeva and Jason Smith’s FS Siena won a merit award; and Maria Doreuli and Katerina Kochkina of Contrast Foundry won a merit award for handlettering.

Louisa Fröhlich released Lisbeth with TypeTogether.

Several Alphabettes made signs and marched in Washington, DC and around the world on January 21 to register their dissent from the new American regime. ✊

* Yes, January. We’ll be back with February’s news before you know it. We’ve been busy!